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Archive for the ‘RoCE’ Category

RoCE Benefits on Full Display at Ignite 2015

May 27th, 2015

ignite-2015

On May 4-8, IT professionals and enterprise developers gathered in Chicago for the 2015 Microsoft Ignite conference. Attendees were given a first-hand glimpse at the future of a variety of Microsoft business solutions through a number of sessions, presentations and workshops.

Of particular note were two demonstrations of RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) technology and the resulting benefits for Windows Server 2016. In both demos, RoCE technology showed significant improvements over Ethernet implementations without RDMA in terms of throughput, latency and processor efficiency.

Below is a summary of each presentation featuring RoCE at Ignite 2015:

Platform Vision and Strategy (4 of 7): Storage Overview
This demonstration highlighted the extreme performance and scalability of Windows Server 2016 through RoCE enabled servers populated with NVMe and SATA SSDs. It simulated application and user workloads using SMB3 servers with Mellanox ConnectX-4 100 GbE RDMA enabled Ethernet adapters, Micron DRAM and enterprise NVMe SSDs for performance and SATA SSDs for capacity.

During the presentation, the use of RoCE compared to TCP/IP showcased drastically different performance. With RDMA enabled, the SMB3 server was able to achieve about twice the throughput, half the latency and around 33 percent less CPU overhead than that attained by TCP/IP.

Check out the video to see the demonstration in action.

Enabling Private Cloud Storage Using Servers with Local Disks

Claus Joergensen, a principal program manager at Microsoft, demonstrated a Windows Server 2016’s Storage Spaces Direct with Mellanox’s ConnectX-3 56Gb/s RoCE with Micron RAM and M500DC local SATA storage.

The goal of the demo was to highlight the value of running RoCE on a system as it related to performance, latency and processor utilization. The system was able to achieve a combined 680,000 4KB IOPS and 2ms latency when RoCE was disabled. With RoCE enabled, the system increased the 4KB IOPS to about 1.1 million and reduced the latency to 1ms. This translated roughly to a 40 percent increase in performance with RoCE enabled, all while utilizing the same amount of CPU resources.

For additional information, watch a recording of the presentation (demonstration starts at 57:00).

For more videos from Ignite 2015, visit Ignite On Demand.

Bill Lee

Accelerating Data Movement with RoCE

April 29th, 2015

On April 14-16, Ethernet designers and experts from around the globe gathered at the Ethernet Technology Summit 2015 to discuss developments happening within the industry as it pertained to the popular networking standard. IBTA’s Diego Crupnicoff, co-chair of the Technical Working Group, shared his expertise with attendees via a presentation on “Accelerating Data Movement with RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE).” The session focused on the ever-growing complexity, bandwidth requirements and services of data centers and how RoCE can address the challenges that emerge from new enterprise data center initiatives.

Here is a brief synopsis of the points that Diego covered in his well-attended presentation:

People are living in an ever-increasing digital world. In the last decade, there’s been an explosion of connected devices that are running many applications and creating massive amounts of data in the process that must be accessible anytime, anywhere.

accelerating-data-movement-with-roce_image

Over time, the data center has emerged as the workhorse of the networking industry, with the increased pace of the ‘information generation’ generating many new data center initiatives, such as the cloud, virtualization and hyper-converged infrastructure. Expectations for enhanced accessibility to larger sets of data are straining enterprise data networks, bringing about a variety of new challenges to the industry, including the following needs:

• Scale and Flexibility
• Overlays & Shared Storage
• Reduce Latency
• Rapid Server-to-Server I/O
• Big Storage, Large Clusters
• New Scale-out Storage Traffic

The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) has had difficulty keeping up with some traffic stemming from newer, more demanding applications. In these cases, packet processing over TCP saturates CPU resources, resulting in networks with low bandwidth, high latency and limited scalability. The industry was in need of a capability that would bypass the CPU altogether to enable faster, more efficient movement of data between servers.

The advent of Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) did just that, utilizing hardware offloads to move data faster with less CPU overhead. By offloading the I/O from the CPU, users of RDMA experience lower latency while freeing up the CPU to focus its resources on applications that process data as opposed to moving it.

Recently, RDMA expanded into the enterprise market and is now being widely adopted over Ethernet networks with RDMA over Converged Ethernet or RoCE. The RoCE standard acts as an efficient, lightweight transport that’s layered directly over Ethernet, bypassing the TCP/IP stack. It offers the lowest latency in the Ethernet industry, which enables faster application completion, better server utilization and higher scalability. Given these advantages, RoCE became the most widely deployed Ethernet RDMA standard, resulting in millions of RoCE-capable ports on the market today.

For additional details on the benefits of RDMA for Ethernet networks, including RoCE network considerations and use cases, view the presentation in its entirety here.

Mike Jochimsen, co-chair of the Marketing Working Group (MWG) at IBTA

Mike Jochimsen, co-chair of the Marketing Working Group (MWG) at IBTA

IBTA Member Companies to Exhibit and Present at Ethernet Technology Summit 2015

April 14th, 2015

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The Ethernet Technology Summit 2015 kicks off today at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. The three-day conference offers seminars, forums, panels and exhibits for Ethernet designers of all levels to discuss new developments, share expertise and learn from prominent industry leaders. Sessions run April 14-16 and exhibits are open April 15-16.

IBTA members exhibiting at the show include:

• Cisco – Booth #201-203
• Mellanox Technologies – Booth #304
• QLogic Corporation – Booth #300-302

Be sure to stop by their booths and ask about their RDMA solutions.

Additionally, Diego Crupnicoff, co-chair of the Technical Working Group from member company Mellanox Technologies, will participate in the “Forum 1B: Ethernet in Data Centers (Data/Telco Centers Track)” session on Wednesday, April 15 from 8:30 to 10:50 a.m.

Specifically, Diego will present on “Accelerating Data Movement with RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE)” and how RoCE addresses the challenges that are emerging from new data center initiatives. This is an excellent opportunity to learn about RoCE and other enhancements required to meet the ever-growing needs of an optimized, flexible data center.

In addition there are other presentations, panel discussions, and keynotes given by representatives of IBTA members Broadcom, Cisco, Intel, Mellanox, Microsoft, Molex, and QLogic. For a complete schedule and description of the 2015 Summit sessions, click here.

Bill Lee

Storage with Intense Network Growth and the Rise of RoCE

February 4th, 2015

On January 4 and 5, the Entertainment Storage Alliances held the 14th annual Storage Visions conference in Las Vegas, highlighting advances in storage technologies utilized in consumer electronics, the media and entertainment industries. The theme of Storage Visions 2015 was Storage with Intense Network Growth (SWING), which was very appropriate given the explosions going on in both data storage and networking.

SV1

While the primary focus of Storage Visions is storage technologies, this year’s theme acknowledges the corollary between storage growth and network growth. Therefore, among the many sessions offered on increased capacity and higher performance, the storage networking session was specifically designed to educate the audience on advances in network technology – “Speed is the Need: High Performance Data Center Fabrics to Speed Networking.”

More pressure is being put on the data center network from a variety sources, including continued growth in enterprise application transactions, new sources of data (aka, big data) and the growth in streaming video and emergence of 4K video. According to Cisco, global IP data center traffic will grow 23% annually to 8.7 zettabytes by 2018. Three quarters of this traffic will be inter-data center, or traffic between servers (East-West) or between servers and storage (North-South). Given this, data centers need to factor in technologies designed to optimize data center traffic.

Global Data Center IP Traffic Forecast, Cisco Global Cloud Index, 2013-2018

Global Data Center IP Traffic Forecast, Cisco Global Cloud Index, 2013-2018

Global Data Center Traffic By Destination, Cisco Global Cloud Index, 2013-2018

Global Data Center Traffic By Destination, Cisco Global Cloud Index, 2013-2018

Storage administrators have always placed emphasis on two important metrics, I/O operations per second (IOPS) and throughput, to measure the ability of the network to server storage devices. Lately, a third metric, latency, has become equally important. When balanced with the IOPS and throughput, low latency technologies can bring dramatic benefits to storage.
At this year’s Storage Visions conference, I was asked to sit on a panel discussing the benefits of Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) for storage traffic. I specifically called out the benefits of RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE). Joining me on the panel were representatives from Mellanox, speaking about InfiniBand, and Chelsio, speaking about iWARP. The storage-focused audience showed real interest in the topic and asked a number of insightful questions about RDMA benefits for their storage implementations.

RoCE in particular will bring specific benefits to data center storage environments. As the purest implementation of the InfiniBand specification in the Ethernet environment, it has the ability to provide the lowest latency for storage. In addition, it capitalizes on the converged Ethernet standards defined in the IEEE 802.1 standards for Ethernet, include Congestion Management, Enhanced Transmission Selection and Priority Flow Control, which collectively allow for lossless transmission, bandwidth allocation and quality of service. With the introduction of RoCEv2 in September 2014, the technology moves from support for a (flat) Layer 2 network to become a routable protocol supporting Layer 3 networks, allowing for use in distributed storage environments.
Ultimately, what customers need for optimal Ethernet-based storage is technology which will balance between IOPS, throughput, and latency while allowing for flexible storage placement in their network. RoCE addresses all of these needs and is becoming widely available in popular server and storage offerings.

Mike Jochimsen, co-chair of the Marketing Working Group (MWG) at IBTA

Mike Jochimsen, co-chair of the Marketing Working Group (MWG) at IBTA

Tweet: Get a recap from the IBTA's #SWING & #RoCE panel from #StorageVisions: http://blog.infinibandta.org/2015/02/03/storage-with-i…e-rise-of-roce/

The IBTA Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary

December 15th, 2014

Since 1999, the IBTA has worked to further the InfiniBand specification in order to provide the IT industry with an advanced fabric architecture that transmits large amounts of data between data centers around the globe. This year, the IBTA is celebrating 15 years of growth and success.

In its mission to unite the IT industry, the IBTA has welcomed an array of distinguished members including Cray, Microsoft, Oracle and QLogic. The IBTA now boasts over 50 member companies all dedicated to furthering the InfiniBand specification.

The continued growth of the IBTA reflects the IT industry’s dedication to the advancement of InfiniBand. Many IBTA member companies are developing products incorporating InfiniBand technology, including FDR, which has proven to be the fastest growing generation of InfiniBand technology: FDR adoption grew 76 percent year over year from 80 systems in 2013 to 141 systems in 2014. Most recently, the Top500 list announced that 225 of the world’s most powerful computers chose InfiniBand as their interconnect device in 2014.

2014 also marked the release of RoCEv2. RoCEv2 is an extension of the original RoCE specification announced in 2010 that brought benefits of Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) I/O architecture to Ethernet-based networks. The updated specification addresses the needs of today’s evolving enterprise data centers by enabling routing across Layer 3 networks. By extending RoCE to allow Layer 3 routing, the specification can provide better traffic isolation and enables hyperscale data center deployments.

Below is a timeline that further illustrates the IBTA’s advancements over the past 15 years that have helped to bring InfiniBand technology to the forefront of the interconnect industry.

ibta-15th-anniv-graph

Volume 1 – General Specification
Volume 2 – Physical Specification

Bill Lee

IBTA Announces New RoCE Specification

September 16th, 2014

Big news! The IBTA today announced the updated specification for Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) over Converged Ethernet (RoCE), RoCEv2. This is a huge development and one that will expand RoCE’s adoption.

The benefits of the first RoCE spec released in 2010 were many:

  • Low latency and CPU overhead (eliminated the multiple data copies inside the server)
  • High network utilization
  • Support for message passing, sockets and storage protocols
  • Supported by all major operating systems

RoCEv2 extends the original RoCE specification by enabling routing across Layer 3 networks and as a result provides better isolation and enables hyperscale data center deployments. This addresses the needs of today’s evolving data centers which require more efficient data movement over a variety of network topologies.

With a number of vendors including Dell and Zadara Storage recently adopting RoCE, this new specification comes at the perfect time. Major cloud providers and Web 2.0 companies are also adopting RoCE in order to combat the challenges of running compute intensive applications and processing massive amounts of data in hyperscale networking environments.

Representatives from IBTA member companies including Emulex, IBM, Mellanox, Microsoft and Software Forge, Inc. participated in the development of this new standard, which will help enterprises to more widely adopt RoCE and improve infrastructure efficiency.

For more information, read the full IBTA announcement.

Bill Lee

Recent Trends toward RoCE Adoption

September 2nd, 2014

The RoCE specification was released back in April, 2010 to address the need for efficient RDMA in end to end Ethernet networks. With the increase in enterprise data traffic and the emergence of hyperscale infrastructure, the need for efficient networking continues to grow.  Here are the latest examples of RoCE in the field.

RoCE Accelerates Microsoft Windows Azure

Albert Greenberg, an architect with IBTA member Microsoft, describes in his keynote address to the Open Network Summit this year how they are using RoCE in their storage offering.  RoCE over 40GbE enabled line-rate performance with zero CPU usage.  At the same time they were able to use less CPUs than would otherwise be needed.

RoCE Used in Dell Fluid Cache for SAN pool

Dell’s Fluid Cache for SAN accelerates applications requiring high data I/O. The servers in this pool are connected to each other by RoCE NICs, making use of the technology to quickly move data between the nodes without facing bottlenecks from the slow operating system kernel.

RoCE Can Do What Ethernet Alone Cannot

IBTA member Applied Micro is continuing to roll out its X-Gene family of 64-bit processors. These processors support RoCE, giving 10GbE some of the low-latency capabilities that used to only be available to InfiniBand. The decrease in latency for Ethernet means transaction latencies also decrease, better positioning the X-Gene family to make a difference in modern workloads.

RoCE Provides Exceptional Performance for Storage Solutions

Zadara Storage announced a new high performance STaaS solution offer for private clouds that uses an Ethernet transport mechanism for exceptional performance at reduced costs. Developed as a collaboration with IBTA member Mellanox Technologies, this solution boosts application performance using the iSCSI Extensions for RDMA (iSER) over RoCE, delivering substantially improved latency and throughput and therefore delivering cost savings and converged enterprise storage for private clouds of all sizes.

RoCE Helps Data Centers Account for New Technology for the Cloud

With the huge acceleration of data centers to the cloud, low latency is becoming increasingly important to avoid bottlenecks and incorporate new technologies seamlessly. RoCE, says SYS-CON Media’s Barbara Porter, is one way to plan for the barrage of new technology that’s coming our way, and to reduce latency overall in the cloud.

Bill Lee